GUIDELINES FOR STUDENT PEER REVIEW PROCESS

GUIDELINES FOR STUDENT PEER REVIEW PROCESS

1) As a reviewer, all of your critiques and praise should be directed at the paper, about the paper,
and not at the author of the paper (i.e., not at other students).
2) When reviewing a paper, respond descriptively as a reader, and not as a writer or a judge. Do
not tell the author how you would write the paper. For example:
(a) Identify places in the paper you do not understand or gaps in reasoning and sentence
flow.
(b) Instead of showing the author what you would do (i.e., rewriting some aspect of the
paper), describe your experience, and encourage the author to address what you are
reacting to.
(c) Asking questions is a good way to be helpful. Open ended questions are often best,
for example:
• “Which research finding are you referring to here?”
• “I don’t understand your use of the underlined phrase. Can you rewrite this
sentence?”
• “Can you provide specific details to show what you mean here?”
• “I lost the thread of your argument. Why is this information important? How is
it related to your research question?”
• “You imply that this point supports your argument, but it actually contradicts
your point above, in paragraph 3.”
3) When reviewing a paper, make positive comments too. Identify sentences, examples, or
paragraphs that are especially clear and help you understand what the author is doing and why
they are doing it.
• “This excellent example moves your point forward.”
• “Wonderful transition that helped clarify the connection between the two
studies you are summarizing.”
• “An apt metaphor that helped me understand your argument

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